Sunday, November 4, 2018

Caterpillar guide

Caterpillars can be tough to identify. And then try to remember which ones are which, based on what you've observed before! So I decided to compile a post of my caterpillar sightings, using both my blog and my iNaturalist observations. This will be a post that I'll update and better organize as I go along. I hope these help you out as well!



Giant leopard moth (Hypercompe scribonia)

Gulf fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

  Variegated fritillary (Euptoieta claudia)
Pipevine swallowtail (Battus philenor)

Geometer moths (family Geometridae)

 Armyworm moths (genus Spodoptera)

Cutworms and dart moths (subfamily Noctuinae)

Obscure sphinx moth (Erinnyis obscura) 


 Snowberry clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)

Cutworms and dart moths (subfamily Noctuinae)


Tobacco budworm moth (Chloridea virescens)

 Carolina sphinx moth (Manduca sexta)


Lassaux's sphinx moth (Erinnyis lassauxii)

Obscure sphinx moth (Erinnyis obscura)



Rustic sphinx moth (Manduca rustica)

Tersa sphinx (Xylophanes tersa)

 White-lined sphinx moth (Hyles lineata)

Queen (Danaus gilippus)

Genus Phigalia

 Black swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Eastern tiger swallowtail (Papilio glaucus)

Grote's buckmoth (Hemileauca grotei)

Pug moths (Genus Eupithecia)

 Ilia underwing (Catocalia ilia)

Genista broom moth (Uresiphita reversalis)

Cutworms and dart moths (subfamily Noctuinae)


 Salt marsh moth (Estigmene acrea)

 Bordered patch (Chlosyne lacinia)

Crimson patch (Chlosyne janais

 Theona checkerspot (Chlosyne theona)

Southern dogface (Zerene cesonia


Black swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes)

Flannel moths (family Megalopygidae)

Forest tent moth (Malacosoma disstria)

Genistra broom moth (Uresiphita reversalis


 Large yellow underwing (Noctua pronuba)


Polyphemus moth (Antheraea polyphemus)

 Maybe Geometridae family


4 comments:

Rebecca said...

That is A LOT of caterpillars. What a fabulous list.

Sheryl Smith-Rodgers said...

Thanks! I already have another one to add!

Lizzieht said...

This is incredible! Thank you for sharing and educating!

Sheryl Smith-Rodgers said...

You are so welcome!!

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